Baldacci Blog

CAB & COW

September 20th, 2010 by Debi | No Comments »

CAB&COWcroppedIs there a better way to spend your afternoon than enjoying our amazing 2007 Baldacci Family Vineyards wines? Well … we think that we can one-up this … how about spending the afternoon at Baldacci Family Vineyards enjoying our amazing 2007 Cabernets AND some 2007 Cabernets from Mi Sueño Winery (this is the winery owned by our winemaker, Rolando Herrera http://misuenowinery.com) AND filling up on beef sliders from Snake River Farms (plus all the fixin’s)? If this sounds like the perfect afternoon for you then please join us on Saturday, Sept 25 from 12-5 pm for an afternoon of CAB & COW! Tickets are $40 per person in advance and $50 per person on the day of the event. The ticket price gives you access to all the CAB & COW that you want to enjoy — and we will even have some other cellar surprises to enjoy!! Please contact Fran in the Tasting Room fleach@baldaccivineyards.com to get your tickets. If you mention that you saw this information online then we’ll give you $5 off the individual ticket price! See you on Saturday …

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Giving back to the Napa Valley

July 24th, 2010 by Debi | No Comments »

Baldacci Family Vineyards is passionate about family and we try to support education for children in as many ways as possible. On August 14th , we are proud to host the second anual NASHVILLE IN NAPA, an event that raises money to support music education for children in our schools. Through NOTES for EDUCATION, we have partnered with songwriters from Nashville and fellow winemakers from the Napa Valley to share the behind-the-scenes of what, we believe to be, the most passionate endeavors — writing the songs that get stuck in our heads … and making the wine that fills our glasses! The evening event raises money that not only goes right back to the schools in our Napa Valley but also extends to the schools in Nashville, TN. (www.nashvilleinnapa.com)

How do you get involved in your community — near or far?

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Why is there mustard in the vineyards?

March 8th, 2010 by Debi | 20 Comments »

Mustard in our new Blocks 3 & 4So many people ask us about the beautiful yellow carpet of mustard flowers in the vineyard each spring. I thought that I would let our “expert” field that question. Garrett Buckland, from Premiere Viticultural Services, is part of our Vineyard Management Team. He brings an amazing wealth of knowledge to us (think Mr. Science in a vineyard) and helps us to make the best decisions possible as we create our Farm Plan each year. Our goals are always the same — we try to grow our grapes in the most sustainable way possible to produce the world-class fruit that you expect to be the foundation of our Baldacci Family Vineyards wines — but each year, Garrett helps us to responds to the changing natural environment (more or less rain, frost, etc).

I asked Garrett “why is there mustard in the vineyards” and he edited my question to address the mustards that are both naturally occurring and planted in our new vineyard block. Read what he said … you might need a dictionary!!

Why we have Mustard in the new blocks at Baldacci by Garrett Buckland

At Baldacci we have encouraged the mustard growth to help suppress nematode population and we have planted our own varieties that are specifically bred to have high levels of Glucosinolate compounds, or are “extra spicy.”  These include, Black mustard, Nemfix mustard, IdaGold Mustard, Oilseed radish, Diakon radish and wild radishes.  When we incorporate these plants back into the ground they will break down just as the first populations of nematodes are gearing up to do damage to our young vines, which usually coincides well with a soil temperature of about 60 degrees F. 

Like all farmed crops, young grapevines can be very sensitive to plant parasitic nematode populations which can cause lots of problems in proper development of a vineyard.  It’s very important to use all of the cultural techniques when we can to naturally reduce harmful nematodes rather than applying costly and dangerous chemicals to accomplish the same goal.  In this situation we can let the right winter cover crop do the work for us.

Most members of the Brassica genus like rapeseeds, radishes, and mustards contain high levels biofumigants that suppress nematode populations.  There are several different products that are released when mustards breakdown in the soil that disrupt the reproductive cycle of nematodes, and some that act as biofumigants similar to commercial fumigants used today.  The compounds that work the best in reducing populations are the Glucosinolates, which degrades naturally into the soil into methyl isothiocyanate, a strong bio-nematicide.  In general the more Glucosinolate compounds mustards have the better a nematicide they are.  Glucosinolates are the class of compounds that provide the “spiciness” to mustards and radish species and the pungent flavors and odors to popular food products of mustards and horseradish.  In Napa the most common “endemic” mustard is black mustard, with many different species present up and down the valley, always with bright yellow flowers.  Also quite common and endemic to this region is wild radish, which can have a variety of colors in its flowers from white to pink to almost purple. 

You often see these mustards spring up in fields when they haven’t been there for 10 years or more.  Mustard seeds have been known to persist in soils for upwards of 20 years, and can often spring up where they haven’t been by simply discing a field at the right time.  Here at the winery most of the wild mustard has already bloomed and set seed, while most of our planted species will continue to be bloom for another month or so.

Libby with her friend, Capone, in the vineyards

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January 2010 – TO DO’s

January 11th, 2010 by Debi | 2 Comments »

TO DO:

#1. Write TO DO list.

#2. Rethink and edit this massive list

Its always the same — resolutions and then the stark reality that what we do all day might actually be enough and that these endless “To Do’s” will only make us crazy!! Here at the winery, we make our lists with great intentions and then get caught up in the present (greeting visitors, answering emails, shipping wine) and we never get to that elusive Blue Sky Thinking that we think we need.

So, for 2010, we resolve …  to be happy;  to enjoy fantastic wine — ours and our fellow vintners; to stay in touch with our friends; and to learn something new as often as possible (let’s not push the everyday thing!).

What do you all resolve? We hope that your plans include Baldacci Family Vineyards. Please let us know when you visit either in person or virtually. We love to hear from you as often as possible. Happy 2010!!

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Merry Christmas from Baldacci Family Vineyards

December 24th, 2009 by Debi | No Comments »

Happy Holidays!We wish all of our friends and family the happiest of holidays! We all look forward to these days as we share good times and great wines. We hope that you all can raise a glass to good health and happiness in 2010!!

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Was 10 Days too many??

December 14th, 2009 by Debi | 2 Comments »

The 10 days of the Baldacci White RED Christmas are over. Did we over do?? Is 10 days too many days to let you know about some great deals on our wines? We did have many more (!!) but decided that 10 would be just right. It was our attempt to give everyone some ideas to share Baldacci Family Vineyards wines. Does anyone have any other ideas? For now, we will give it a rest … but with some inspiration, who knows! We hope that you all are enjoying the Holidays and keeping a glass of wine nearby! Cheers and Best Wishes!!

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Baldacci (White) Red Christmas

December 8th, 2009 by Debi | No Comments »

Baldacci White Red Christmas has been running every day to give all our customers some fun ideas to give (and get) from the winery for the Holidays. Each day is a new special with the exception of the “Napa Resident” which continues  to run daily (until Saturday, December 12) and gives you a chance to live the Napa Lifestyle for a weekend with plenty of great Baldacci Family Vineyards wine to keep you happy throughout the entire year! Check out the wine page on the website baldaccivineyards.com to find out more each day!

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SF Chronicle visits Baldacci Family Vineyards

November 30th, 2009 by Debi | 5 Comments »

Did many of you get a chance to see the article in the Sunday, Nov 29th, Travel Section of the San Francisco Chronicle?  Check out the link to see what they had to say about “A find, hidden among Silverado’s heavy hitters” … but many of you already know!

To read the full story: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2009/11/29/TRKM1ANFC4.DTL

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A New Website to be Thankful for …

November 24th, 2009 by Debi | 3 Comments »

We are thankful for so many things. But, today especially, we are thankful that our new website is live!! Creating a new website is much more complicated than we thought … a year in the making! It has taken countless hours and as many glasses of wine to track down the info and photos that anyone might want to have (at a glance)  — the how’s and why’s of Baldacci Family Vineyards.  We hope that this becomes a site that you enjoy visiting as we continue to update our content with events at the winery, wine tasting notes, and great specials for anyone who is on our email list.

Please let us know if there are any topics that interest you and we can begin some interesting posts to share what we like to talk about … that would be wine … and us (of course!!)

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Where Did The Vines Go?

November 10th, 2009 by Debi | 3 Comments »

After the harvest of 2008, many of you noticed the corner part of the vineyard near the Tasting Room was removed and instead of grapevines you only saw brown dirt. We are starting a process of replanting four acres of our vineyards. These vines (which are Vineyard Blocks 3 and 4) were almost 30 years old and about 90% of them were infected with some disease which left them unable to produce grapes that we could use in our wine. While most Napa Valley Cabernet vineyards produce about 3-4 tons per acre, we were lucky to harvest one ton per acre off this block of the vineyard.

We used large tractors (a D12) and many man hours to remove the vines and rip the soil down about 5 feet to really break up the many years of compaction that occurs from continual farming. Once the ground was cleared, we planted a cover crop of beans and grasses to help build the bio-mass in the structure of the soil. The cover crop grew all winter and early spring until we mowed it to get ready for the new vineyard installation. By late May, we had planted 8000 new Cabernet Sauvignon vines. The vines that we planted were Clone 7 and Clone 31. We decided to plant Dormant Bench grafts which means that these vines have already been growing for two years in a nursery environment before we planted them in our vineyard. As we cultivate these new vineyard blocks, putting our farming practices and emphasis on growth and development of the vines, we hope to see small clusters of Cabernet grapes in the Fall of 2010.

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Photo1

RIPPING OUT THE OLD BLOCK 3 AND 4

 

Photo2

LIBBY (THE DOG) CHECKING OUT THE D12 AS IT IS RIPPING THE VINEYARD

 

Photo3

PERFECTLY CLEARED VINEYARD (WITH BURN PILES)

 

Photo4

THE COVER CROP IS ALMOST AS TALL AS DEBI

 

Photo5

MIKE CHECKING OUT THE BURN PILES

 

Photo6

MOWING THE COVER CROP IN LATE SPRING

 

Photo7

INSTALLING THE END POSTS AND VINEYARD

 

Photo8

SETTING UP THE IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE

 

Photo9

WE ARE READY TO PLANT!!

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